What don’t you get? With BitTorrent, Justin Sun (Tron) bought the entire Internet

If you are a Tron investor, and you freaked out last Wednesday during an admittedly pretty brilliant crypto market crash, you’re doing it wrong.

Not some of it. All of it. Wrong.

Why? Because you don’t understand what Tron was, is, or intends to be throughout its existence, despite many knowledgeable people – who are openly in awe of the shifting tech landscape – begging you to pay attention.

It’s not about the coin, or yesterday’s price, or last month’s price, or tomorrow’s price, or the coin’s price even three or six months from now. The coin, frankly, is irrelevant because it is such a tiny piece to what actually transpired when BitTorrent changed hands and became part of the Tron system.

And what that means going forward.

**********

Introducing Tron Storm

Check out OPERATION TRON STORM! Help spread the Tron word! #iamdecentralized

**********

 

The first mistake many folks make when capping Tron’s potential is using its age. True, the company is barely a year old. However, from the moment Justin Sun breathed Tron into existence, he entered an ongoing race that wasn’t complete until the contract papers dried this summer. It was a race to own something other mammoth companies, like Facebook and Twitter, that have or had used BitTorrent for key system upgrades. It was a race to own the system that another company very badly wanted to use and pay seeders for torrents using Bitcoin (and later, Bitcoin Cash). It was a race to own the protocol that Bitcoin itself is based on.

That sounds kinda cool, right? But, how important is that really? Well, consider what Bitcoin itself actually does. And, also consider why all of those companies (and many others) also sought to control BitTorrent to the point that Sun had to get a court order to prevent any other negotiations except for his.

“In the same way the Internet flattened access to information and allowed anyone in the world with an Internet connection to learn basically anything they wanted to know, and to communicate with anyone else on Earth, Bitcoin does that with money,” says Erik Voorhees, Founder & CEO, Shapeshift, in “Bitcoin: Beyond the Bubble” (see below).

“So now, anyone on the planet, no matter their age or the arbitrary geographic location in which they were born, or the arbitrary rules of the people who govern over them; that person can now engage economically with anyone else in the world directly,” he says. “And, that’s profoundly powerful.”

With that in mind, and then pairing that info with the understanding that Bitcoin does for money and financial transactions what BitTorrent does for peer-to-peer file sharing in general, including full websites, you begin to understand the power that Voorhees spoke about. 

BitTorrent unlocks the whole damn thing. It always has. Even Satoshi Nakamoto knew it.

That’s what “decentralization” means. That’s what Justin Sun means when he says it (and he says it constantly). That’s what Tron means every time you read it – from marketing to whitepapers to social media.

In effect, Justin Sun bought the Internet.

I’ll say it again, and I want you to slowly read each word. Let it sink in.

JUSTIN SUN … BOUGHT … THE … WHOLE … ******* … INTERNET.

(And, at a reported $120 million, he did it for the same amount of money the Baltimore Ravens once paid Joe Flacco to be a slightly above average NFL quarterback or roughly one-third of what Giancarlo Stanton once signed for with the Miami Marlins.)

In essence, Sun reverse engineered digital dominance by starting with a platform, while also figuring out a way to ensure token burn and supply freeze – all while keeping his investors engaged through the whole process. It’s the birth of an entire ecosystem that uses many pieces that couldn’t quite put it all together in the past.

His system is every computer, every user. You aren’t just using Tron when you jump on to download or seed a file. You are Tron.

So, if you’re really and truly interested in seeing your investment grow. Be a user. Encourage others to use. Brush off your old Napster skills and get BitTorrent up and running. Use SeedIt to tip others with Tron on Twitter. Participate in Super Representative elections. Buy tokens that represent projects already calling Tron home. If anything, just get a Tron wallet created.

Do any or all of that, and you’ll be handling your Tron investment the right way.

(Thank you to @wlfofmyst, @mobrules1968, and @mikehan36064472 for their research for this post.)

*****

Have a tip?

What topics would you like to read about as we all grow with Crypto, Tron, and all the rest? Shoot an email to kitchenski@gmail.com with “Blog idea” in your subject line, or find me on Twitter at twitter.com/curtiskitchen.

Other recent posts:

And, FULL DISCLOSURE: I am a Tron (TRX) investor. I am not a financial advisor. This content should not be used as a base for or considered to be financial advice.

Advertisements

Bitcoin just stumbled; will Tron (and others) push it out of the way?

We’re in bloggy territory here, right? So, let’s break from an air of reporting and columnizing and just shoot the breeze for a second.

It’s been a while since I last posted. That’s what happens when you welcome a new daughter to the world. She doesn’t sleep much when she’s supposed to, but pretty sure she’s a keeper. Even if she’s already proven capable of firing off biological weapons when diapers aren’t on.

On that note, let’s talk about something else that stunk up the place the past few days.

Just what the hell was the mix-up regarding Bitcoin and Starbucks? I watched the headlines roll out before everybody and their dog blamed the media for a supposed mix-up that first said crypto currencies such as Bitcoin could soon be used for coffee things. Then, Starbucks comes back and decafs everybody by saying you won’t. Instead, you’ll be able to use an exchange to convert crypto into dollars that then can be used for Starbucks.

On a excited scale from 1-10, that news ranked -2009 Satoshis.

What that news also did for me, however, is point out the core issue with Bitcoin – something I hadn’t quite been able to wrap my head around until now.

Everyone wants to see Bitcoin increase in value again, but mass adoption has become the game and nobody knows to make that work with Bitcoin at this point. It’s like they’re just hoping interest picks up again.

Some want it as a currency. Others want it as some sort of investment safehaven like gold or silver. Others still just want to see it get adopted in the general public marketplace. And, there always will be the group that doesn’t care nuthin’ ’bout nuthin’ except for when the next BTC bull will run.

The more I watch, the more it seems there really isn’t a strategy other than wishful thinking that demand for Bitcoin will again go up someday – with a limited supply again driving a huge demand for no good reason at all. Supporters and investors are simply hoping somebody decides to inject Bitcoin into the general marketplace because, “Hey, everybody knows Bitcoin…of course, it will go up again!”

Bitcoin has been the front-runner for a long time and probably will be for a while longer. It had a giant head start. But, other coin and blockchain producers have realized there has to be something behind the currency (and all the value that comes with it) to drive it. It has to be a solution provider.

Ripple gets that like few others. And, so does Tron.

Tron has presented itself as a blockchain solution provider first and foremost – with tokens coming in second. And, in the past year — especially in the past few months — quick digging sees an increasing number of Upside Down-like vines tentacled out from Justin Sun’s creation. Nodes are growing on the system daily, and so are wallets. Businesses around the world are beginning to accept Tron as payment.

As I said on Twitter recently, Tron isn’t trying to be part of “a” system. It wants to be the whole system. The coins are nice because they give investors a chance to grab the moving train, but the real power comes from a fast-building network.

Shit is everywhere, man. And, it’s growing.

So, Starbucks, you want to go ahead and make the next logical grande move to actually accepting crypto for your overpriced drinks? Tron is already making that life easy.

You should look into it.

*****

Have a tip?

What topics would you like to read about as we all grow with Crypto, Tron, and all the rest? Shoot an email to kitchenski@gmail.com with “Blog idea” in your subject line, or find me on Twitter at twitter.com/curtiskitchen.

Other recent posts:

And, FULL DISCLOSURE: I am a Tron (TRX) investor. I am not a financial advisor. This content should not be used as a base for or considered to be financial advice.

‘Face’ plant: Facebook is vulnerable and opening doors for Tron (and others)

I’ve always marveled at the Pan American Airlines story – how it went from a sure-fire, can’t-miss, top-of-the-world, safest-ever, long-term investment to bankrupt and dead within two decades.

It was a stunning collapse because what could have seemed more investment safe at the time than a strong worldwide airline?tron-facebook-justin-sun-mark-zuckerberg

That said, Pan Am’s downfall was brought on by several factors – many of which were outside of the airline’s control. But, that’s the rub, isn’t it? The best strategic plans try like hell to keep a business flexible, but if integral pieces fall apart — for Pan Am it was fuel shortages, failed acquisitions, and the Gulf War — it doesn’t matter.

What I’ve always kept in mind from that is vulnerability can come from anywhere and at any time for any company.

So … about Facebook.

A company that seemed to have the world at its feet and a CEO with rumored presidential aspirations as recently as 16 months ago has been staggered with data controversy, security concerns, prioritizing ad revenues above content value, and waning user engagement.

And that was the good news …

That all was before Wednesday when the actual -$123 billion shitburger was served to investors by maligned Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, who also had to warn his audience that the worst may not be over as the company may struggle* with earnings going forward* The loss set a dubious mark by losing the most market cap ever in a single day by a U.S.-traded company.

*Let’s use “struggle” in a sentence. A company may struggle when it can no longer sell data to shitty people for shitty reasons and play dumb about it while cashing checks.

It puts the behemoth in suddenly vulnerable territory, but it shouldn’t be surprising. Why? Pull the hood back for a second and look at the engine.

Facebook’s growth plan, for a long time, has employed a strategy of “build, and if you can’t build it better, buy out the competition” – everything from photos and chat to file transfers, mobile chat, and face recognition. In fact, a lot of Facebook’s best features came from that approach. However, the platform doesn’t have it all, especially when it comes to streaming content. It tried and couldn’t land NFL games, though it found other sports live streaming avenues. And, maybe more topical or relevant to the next point I’m about to make, it recognized about six years ago how awesome BitTorrent was as a tool for sending updates to its servers worldwide.

Wouldn’t that have been handy to have in house? The fact that the company doesn’t own the system it uses for something as important as having an ability to update all servers ASAP? Especially, say, in a security crisis? That’s airline-can’t-afford-fuel vulnerable.

You know who does own BitTorrent? And is growing in its ability to offer super-fast transactions, development, and content?

Of course, you do.

At the risk of making it sound like Justin Sun (slash Tron) just happened to be lucky and fell into securing BitTorrent, Facebook (and whoever else wanted BitTorrent) didn’t lock down a vulnerability.*

*Misstep? Overlooked? Just couldn’t get it? Wish I knew. (Feel free to confidentially email me if you do.)

Bottom line is Facebook, which appeared to be locked in for the foreseeable future as a giant, the giant, in social, online, and digital services, has a leak.

And, just a year old, Tron, with its Virtual Machine becoming fully available in a few days, its growing list of acquired capabilities, and its expanding partnerships, could very well have the kind of glue Zuckerberg needs to patch things back together.

*****

Have a tip? 

Or, what topics would you like to read about as we all grow with Crypto and Blockchain? Shoot an email to kitchenski@gmail.com with “Blog idea” in your subject line, or find me on Twitter at twitter.com/curtiskitchen. And, FULL DISCLOSURE: I am a Tron (TRX) investor. I am not a financial advisor. This content should not be used as a base for or considered to be financial advice.

Read more:

Hollywood eyeing Tron/BitTorrent?

“The old guard are following events, and watching carefully.”

A few weeks ago, the public general reaction to Justin Sun and Tron purchasing BitTorrent ranged on a scale from “BitTorrent is still a thing?” to “What’s a Tron?”

Within the blockchain and crypto communities, however, the move created one hell of a buzz.

In that excitement, Tron loyalists have begun digging into BitTorrent’s history. What they are finding are loads of examples of exactly why Justin Sun made it a priority to add not just any peer-sharing apparatus, but this one. 

Some of what was uncovered in recent days:

– Though it made news this past week by visiting with Sun, Twitter was on board with BitTorrent … all the way back in 2010.

– So was Facebook.

– At its core, BitTorrent’s Paygate service in 2014 was headed in the right direction for putting a lot of money back in the pockets of artists.

– And, an added bonus for you: Want to know why the Tron/BitTorrent match is absolutely perfect? Read this 2014 piece from the Harvard Business Review and keep Tron in your mind as you consider the article’s final paragraph.

Putting ALL of that aside, it’s no secret that Hollywood itself knows BitTorrent’s potential power. It also has been watching BitTorrent’s move. “The old guard are following events, and watching carefully,” a Hollywood production insider told me.

It all has brought legitimacy to Tron’s stated larger vision of decentralizing the Internet and putting creative control back fully in the hands of entertainment creators.*


*If you’re new to this concept, do you know Taylor Swift? She famously wrote an opinion piece for the Wall Street Journal in 2014 and in it said:

“It’s my opinion that music should not be free,
and my prediction is that individual artists and their labels
will someday decide what an album’s price point is.”

Swift was almost right, except, with Tron’s smart contracts abilities, an artist wouldn’t even need the label if they didn’t want to go down that road. Thinking of her words now and pairing her thoughts with today’s Tron option…

Taylor Swift, with her iconic stature, is the unlikely mass-appeal hero that Tron needs and should use to break through to the general public.


But, even still, there seemed to be a large amount of doubt circling Justin Sun’s project – reflected in Tron’s trading price, not to mention in the confidence of pump-addicted detractors willing to share their well-reasoned, logical thoughts via Twitter.

Their issue, of course, is that they don’t, won’t, or can’t see past Tron as anything more than a cryptocurrency. That’s a shame because they’re missing the point.

According to digital content producer Robert S. Seppälä, Tron’s nabbing of BitTorrent is the real deal-maker – far ahead of the Tron token that so many one-pump chumps are hoping to cash in on.

“I agree the ]TRON] currency is cool, but beyond the bean counting, I believe it’s the content and entertainment delivered in the future that will drive this new world of decentralization through Tron,” said Seppälä, who is producer, director, and writer for EverTell. “It’s exciting.”

From many accounts, he’s not alone in that thinking.

****

Have a tip? 

Or, what topics would you like to read about as we all grow with Crypto and Blockchain? Shoot an email to kitchenski@gmail.com with “Blog idea” in your subject line, or find me on Twitter at twitter.com/curtiskitchen. And, FULL DISCLOSURE: I am a Tron (TRX) and Ripple (XRP) investor. I am not a financial advisor. This content should not be used as a base for or considered to be financial advice.

The Tron Virtual Machine is going to rock worlds – yours, mine, everybody’s

Sometimes, you have to let the reality of a dream settle in before you can appreciate it. Then again, being able to see that reality before anyone else is called vision, and there’s a reason why it is such a sought after talent.

Tron is fast becoming that reality for those who follow it — and many more who don’t. It’s what happens when you stop boring the public with barely recognizable terms like “mainnet”, “torrent”, and “blockchain” and instead start mixing in specific panty-droppers like “Twitter”, “Facebook”, “100 million or more users”, “music sharing”, “porn”, “biggest file sharer in the world”, “gaming”, and “Facebook”.

Hi, Tron…er…Shannon.

Yes, friends, those terms are major turn-ons, especially after they’ve all legitimately been linked to Tron in just the last few weeks. (Funny enough, BitTorrent has almost everything to do with that…which has a lot of folks beginning to understand one of the the reasons why BitTorrent was part of Justin Sun’s plan from the beginning.)

When that moment of puzzle-pieces-coming-together realization hits, I imagine it’s like that scene in American Pie when Shannon Elizabeth cozies up to Jason Biggs, who loses control immediately…twice.

Just to make the image clear (because it’s a good one):

Shannon = recent Tron news
Jason = Tron investor

But, this has happened before, hasn’t it?

  • Tron news surfaced late in 2017 about a possible connection to Alibaba, and the charts resembled a Bill Clinton impersonation of the Washington Monument.
  • Tron MainNet goes live, and folks felt like they were led on. (I’m not sure why…it’s like they mistook the vibrating bed turning on for the entire sexual experience.)
  • Ethereum “Independence Day” came and went, and instead of carnal investment bliss, many folks were bored or frustrated with sinking prices amid a prolonged token swap. (I’m still waiting, and it sucks. Thanks, Bittrex.)
  • Never mind that everyone’s current daddy, Bitcoin, keeps sticking its head in at inopportune times and thwarting Tron’s potential growth moments.

And it’s all led to Tron loyalists having to tell the rest of the world that it isn’t about the size of our .0337 coin, it’s the quality.

Hang in there, Tronics. Your Dirk Diggler “star” moment is approaching. As someone who loathes hearing and seeing such a thing from others, it is time to circle a date on the calendar.

July 30.

The Tron Virtual Machine will open for business, and there’s no reason to believe a hungry-eyed group of developers won’t flock to the Sun Bunny Ranch. The list of advantages is well-known by now (easy, cheap, high distribution potential, big partnerships, nice rewards, etc.), and the latest big piece of the machine will be available.

The rest has been extremely nice, but THAT news has me excited. Above a lot of other things, I think that’s when we all will get to see Tron fully come to life and start to grow.

And, if things go right, grow to something big enough to make even Ron Jeremy jealous.

****

What topics would you like to read about as we all grow with Crypto and Blockchain? Shoot an email to kitchenski@gmail.com with “Blog idea” in your subject line, or find me on Twitter at twitter.com/curtiskitchen. And, FULL DISCLOSURE: I am a Tron (TRX) and Ripple (XRP) investor. I am not a financial advisor. This content should not be used as a base for or considered to be financial advice.

Fake news was killing my hope for media, until I found strength in Brut

Having been a part of the media landscape now for something close to the past 15 years, I’ve watched with sadness the increasingly fast erosion of public trust in accredited outlets.

The conversation pains me because I know there are a great many talented and dedicated people who have made gathering and disseminating news their lives, and they have been swept into the “media sucks”/”fake news” swell.

But, I also don’t disregard the base reasons for why public trust has diminished so much during my professional time. As a consumer, I get it. Bait-and-switch headlines, opinions presented as facts, story lines built around viewer and reader demographics, advertorials presented as unbiased content, native advertising, content marketing, etc. I’ve been a part of all of those conversations in some fashion. (And though I agree with the public’s angst, as a marketer, I believe in many of those concepts because they work…which presents sort of a chicken-and-egg something best suited for another blog sometime.)

Much of what is produced today is “I’ll do anything for a click” garbage (a Kansas City sports radio station fell victim to the click sickness this week) that wouldn’t have received a passing grade in my media classes at Washburn University. Where they may have been useful once, I now abhor any conversation that begins with hyperbole headlines or “did you see the top 5 reasons that…”

I had very nearly given up hope that the media industry even gave a damn anymore, resigned to its untrustworthy fate, and I had become even less enthused about citizen journalism, which spiked a few years ago and has since returned to its fringe roots. (It turns out this gathering information and forming consistent, coherent copy is harder than it looks, eh citizen?)

But just when things started happening in the past 12 months. Some examples:

  • Roger Ailes and Fox News were taken to task for improprieties that numbered, I don’t know, somewhere around Bill O’Reilly’s old salary.
  • The Washington Post and New York Times have been spoon-fed so much content from Washington, D.C., that they finally, FINALLY, snapped out of their we-work-for-clicks comas and remembered just how valuable good, original, reporting is – both to the outlet and the general public. (And, God, has it been a joy to watch the two compete since last fall!)
  • And, my personal favorite, the social media giants in this world, led by Facebook, grew up because they had to (thanks, 2016 presidential election!). They decided they do have a responsibility in shepherding content, weeding out intentionally harmful or deceitful crap. But, they went a step farther than that and are backing what I hope is a long-term initiative – the Facebook Journalism Project.

From this project came a spotlight feature this week that helped reinvigorate my belief that there is still a lot of good journalism left to be done in this world – and it is being done with social platforms, digital technology, and some other things that many old-guard institutions swore were the death of journalism.

No, old guard, it is being done, and done well, by brands like Brut (which is just six months old) because they believe in two very simple philosophies: 1) deliver your media product where consumers are (i.e. digitally), and deliver it using those platforms’ rules; and 2) well, I’ll let Brut CEO Guillaume Lacroix explain:

“Today, people don’t care where the news comes from, as long as it is accurate, makes sense, and is interesting,” he said.

Sing it to me, Guillaume.

And his company is already becoming one of the largest outlets in France despite its 12-15 person staff using little more than an iPhone 7, some graphics, and Facebook Live.

It isn’t that there is a lot to learn. Brut’s principles aren’t revolutionary. They just remember what the public really wants – and that’s to be treated as intelligent communities who value content they can trust.

It is an example like this that gives me a renewed great hope for the future of journalism and the media industry, however it evolves.

Content Marketing: From Drip to Deluge

More than ever, content is king.

It drives a never hungrier Internet. It shape-shifts from e-books and blogs to videos, newspaper articles and Internet memes. All of it combines to stuff our faces with brands, messages, agendas and even, on occasion, knowledge. It gets heavy at times, and consumers have pushed back by becoming guarded, skeptical and better informed – often quick to dismiss anything that seems pushy.From Drip to Deluge, content marketing needs time to work.

That leads to a simple question: How does one best reach and engage a savvy consumer on their turf and on their terms? The answer is that even if consumers have become extremely niched, their appetites for information have never been bigger or more efficient. They consume more info and do it faster than before, and that’s a good thing. It leaves room for your message to be on the menu, and the Internet gives you more opportunity than ever to present why your meal is the best choice.

What a glorious table setting for content marketing.

“Content marketing has always been a part of the marketing mix in some fashion, just under different names such as branded content, brand storytelling and so on,” says Kevin Briody, Senior Vice President, Chief Strategy Officer, for Pace.*

*Based in Greensboro, North Carolina, Pace was named 2013 Content Agency of the Year at the second annual Content Marketing Awards.

“However it really took off over the last few years due to how consumers are finding and sharing all that content – in other words, due to the rise of organic search (Google, Bing, etc.) and social media (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, etc.) and their increasing convergence.

“In an incredibly noisy marketing landscape, particularly online, having a powerful, relevant and engaging story to tell has become absolutely critical for brands looking to connect with their customers and prospects. Great storytelling content, and how it fuels organic search and social media, is the root of content marketing as a viable marketing strategy.”

James Meyers is the CEO of Imagination Publishing, which was a finalist for 2013 Content Agency of the Year. He believes the online culture has been a catalyst for content marketing’s boom.

“Unquestionably, the Internet has catapulted the growth of content marketing,” Meyers says. “The combination of needing frequent, valuable content to: improve SEO results; to encourage repeat customer visits; to engage customers; and to feed social networking streams have all become a critical necessity for marketers of all organizations. As a result, agencies of all types – traditional ad agencies, public relations firms and content publishers – have all moved to fill this need. In doing so, they have further elevated the frenzy around content marketing.”

For a marketer who has never attempted a content marketing program, the entire philosophy and process can seem overwhelming and not worth the amount of time, energy and resources it takes to get a program moving. After all, how does one go about affecting the Internet?

But, think of a dry sponge placed under a faucet that has a single drip coming from it. The drip falls, and the sponge absorbs it in quick fashion. You know the water went in; it went somewhere, even if there’s not really any good evidence of such after a brief moment. So, you spend your time and effort keeping the sponge perfectly still while waiting on the faucet to produce another drip, which it does. That drip also hits the sponge in the same spot and seems to disappear. However, this time you can feel where the drip hit. Soon, another drip and then another.

Pretty soon the water’s effect is easily noticeable as it continues to hit the sponge in the same spot and then spread out as more of the sponge begins to absorb the moisture. After a while, the sponge is soaked – all from a steady stream of individual drips.

Now, what if that sponge is your desired consumer group? What if that single drip is your first attempt at content marketing via a new blog entry, a YouTube video tutorial or Pinterest post? Nobody really noticed those first few efforts, probably. However, after some patience, sticking to a targeted approach, and having the resolve to hold your program in place, your message, which smartly has centered on and drummed home the fact that you are the expert of your industry, has saturated your target.

The most critical aspect to any content marketing initiative is, not surprisingly, to make sure you have content.

“A successful content marketing program is a complex undertaking and, depending upon scale, may require full-time resources,” Myers says. “Many organizations have made the mistake of creating a new website or social site, launching it with content and then seen dismal results as they fail to feed constant additional content in a variety of formats to their customers.

“We believe that there are three essential pillars to any successful content marketing program: strategy, content creation and distribution marketing. Without addressing and continuously focusing on all three of these area, most content marketing programs will ultimately fail.”

Briody believes in sharpening your content to the point that it can’t help but hit and impact the desired target; and making sure you can tell just how good the shot was.

“First, define a distinctive brand voice and point of view – why should somebody listen to you instead of all the others out there making noise?” Briody says. “Why should they pay attention in the first place, and keep coming back for more?

“Second, have a goal in mind, one you can measure – so many content marketing programs fail because they set out to “share lots of content” without any clear understanding of how all that content and all that sharing should lead back to measurable business results.

“Third, having a distribution strategy is as important as crafting great content; “Build it and they will come” is something that should only live in movies – it has no place in your content marketing efforts. Just because you launch the World’s Most Amazing Content Hub (or Blog), doesn’t mean anyone is going to find it.

“Lay out your SEO (Organic Search) strategy, then evaluate all the other customer touch points where your amazing content might add value – can it fuel your email marketing, make your social media more effective, add some personality to your events, or some context to your advertising? Where and how can your content be used, so that it has the most chance of being seen, consumed and drive real results?”

As consumers continue to improve their search capabilities, it will become even more vital for marketers to find ways to stand out among competitors. Developing a content marketing plan now, even if you haven’t previously, will go a long ways toward helping accomplish that goal.

“We conducted very successful content programs that have been proven drivers of audience expansion, increased sales leads or conversions, shorter decision cycles, customer engagement and improved loyalty,” Meyers says. “Unlike traditional advertising campaigns where results drop off when the spending stops, content marketing is a long-term program that continues to build over time and has a long residual value tail.”

Briody also believes in content marketing’s staying power.

“I don’t think there really is a ceiling to great content marketing,” Briody says. “If you look at trends the major, iconic brands are following, everyone from Nike to Coke and beyond are making amazing content the centerpiece of their entire digital brand experience.

“It increasingly dominates their traditional advertising and is displacing offer-based promotions in everything from email to social to digital paid media. Great content is rapidly become a de facto requirement for great marketing – so the sky’s the limit.”

*ed note: I wrote this piece in 2014 for the National Auctioneers Association’s Auctioneer magazine. I have made it part of my marketing plan and practice as Director of Publications there to educate NAA members and encourage them to use content marketing. -ck