What don’t you get? With BitTorrent, Justin Sun (Tron) bought the entire Internet

If you are a Tron investor, and you freaked out last Wednesday during an admittedly pretty brilliant crypto market crash, you’re doing it wrong.

Not some of it. All of it. Wrong.

Why? Because you don’t understand what Tron was, is, or intends to be throughout its existence, despite many knowledgeable people – who are openly in awe of the shifting tech landscape – begging you to pay attention.

It’s not about the coin, or yesterday’s price, or last month’s price, or tomorrow’s price, or the coin’s price even three or six months from now. The coin, frankly, is irrelevant because it is such a tiny piece to what actually transpired when BitTorrent changed hands and became part of the Tron system.

And what that means going forward.

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Check out OPERATION TRON STORM! Help spread the Tron word! #iamdecentralized

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The first mistake many folks make when capping Tron’s potential is using its age. True, the company is barely a year old. However, from the moment Justin Sun breathed Tron into existence, he entered an ongoing race that wasn’t complete until the contract papers dried this summer. It was a race to own something other mammoth companies, like Facebook and Twitter, that have or had used BitTorrent for key system upgrades. It was a race to own the system that another company very badly wanted to use and pay seeders for torrents using Bitcoin (and later, Bitcoin Cash). It was a race to own the protocol that Bitcoin itself is based on.

That sounds kinda cool, right? But, how important is that really? Well, consider what Bitcoin itself actually does. And, also consider why all of those companies (and many others) also sought to control BitTorrent to the point that Sun had to get a court order to prevent any other negotiations except for his.

“In the same way the Internet flattened access to information and allowed anyone in the world with an Internet connection to learn basically anything they wanted to know, and to communicate with anyone else on Earth, Bitcoin does that with money,” says Erik Voorhees, Founder & CEO, Shapeshift, in “Bitcoin: Beyond the Bubble” (see below).

“So now, anyone on the planet, no matter their age or the arbitrary geographic location in which they were born, or the arbitrary rules of the people who govern over them; that person can now engage economically with anyone else in the world directly,” he says. “And, that’s profoundly powerful.”

With that in mind, and then pairing that info with the understanding that Bitcoin does for money and financial transactions what BitTorrent does for peer-to-peer file sharing in general, including full websites, you begin to understand the power that Voorhees spoke about. 

BitTorrent unlocks the whole damn thing. It always has. Even Satoshi Nakamoto knew it.

That’s what “decentralization” means. That’s what Justin Sun means when he says it (and he says it constantly). That’s what Tron means every time you read it – from marketing to whitepapers to social media.

In effect, Justin Sun bought the Internet.

I’ll say it again, and I want you to slowly read each word. Let it sink in.

JUSTIN SUN … BOUGHT … THE … WHOLE … ******* … INTERNET.

(And, at a reported $120 million, he did it for the same amount of money the Baltimore Ravens once paid Joe Flacco to be a slightly above average NFL quarterback or roughly one-third of what Giancarlo Stanton once signed for with the Miami Marlins.)

In essence, Sun reverse engineered digital dominance by starting with a platform, while also figuring out a way to ensure token burn and supply freeze – all while keeping his investors engaged through the whole process. It’s the birth of an entire ecosystem that uses many pieces that couldn’t quite put it all together in the past.

His system is every computer, every user. You aren’t just using Tron when you jump on to download or seed a file. You are Tron.

So, if you’re really and truly interested in seeing your investment grow. Be a user. Encourage others to use. Brush off your old Napster skills and get BitTorrent up and running. Use SeedIt to tip others with Tron on Twitter. Participate in Super Representative elections. Buy tokens that represent projects already calling Tron home. If anything, just get a Tron wallet created.

Do any or all of that, and you’ll be handling your Tron investment the right way.

(Thank you to @wlfofmyst, @mobrules1968, and @mikehan36064472 for their research for this post.)

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Have a tip?

What topics would you like to read about as we all grow with Crypto, Tron, and all the rest? Shoot an email to kitchenski@gmail.com with “Blog idea” in your subject line, or find me on Twitter at twitter.com/curtiskitchen.

Other recent posts:

And, FULL DISCLOSURE: I am a Tron (TRX) investor. I am not a financial advisor. This content should not be used as a base for or considered to be financial advice.

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Cause of death: Twitter Bull Run; The deceased: The ICO Journal

Over the past five years, Twitter really hasn’t changed much in the way people use it. Sure, communities are better defined (because we all now know how to hashtag), and there is never a shortage of anonymous tough guys and girls (because…yeah). But, all in all, the platform really hasn’t offered anything new or shocking.

Except…

Even as someone who has served professionally in public relations, marketing, communications, and full-time media roles, it blows my mind, more now than ever, when a brand proves it has zero clue how to use Twitter (or social media in general).

The latest regrettable* example: The ICO Journal.

*Regrettable only because it was wholly preventable. Then again, ol’ Chuck Darwin has an award named after him for a reason. And, at some point, it just gets hard to feel bad for uncoordinated folks who believe they can outmaneuver raging bulls.

So, what caused all of this?

On Tuesday, over several hours, The ICO Journal’s Twitter controller cannonballed like a champ into a shallow pool and hit his or her ass flat on the bottom – from both a journalistic and social media management view point – beginning with this:

Several followers who didn’t appreciate the “dummy” label soon chimed in, and that number grew to many in short order. Meanwhile, the Journal account didn’t seem to mind the new attention, doubling down on that comment with other colorful adjectives to describe Tron enthusiasts they find to be offensive:

It continued, but really, what’s the point in a play-by-play at this stage. It comes down to this: nobody likes a self-important, condescending jerk – especially when there isn’t a good reason for it. And, the result (as of this writing) was a Tron-crowd-led bull run over the account and decrease in about 300 followers.

Earlier, I said this was all wrong from two points of view: journalistic and social media management. Let’s chat about those.

The tweet that began the entire fiasco – even prior to calling out Tron fans – was actually a retweet from a known Tron antagonist (I just joined the crypto community in April, and I’ve already seen the originator blocked by several others) who wanted to peddle a conspiracy theory as hot news and found a willing audience in the ICO Journal account manager.

Instead of (at the very least) vetting the information source and (at least pretending to try) finding more information, the IOC Journal posted it as a “maybe/might have/if/could be possible” rumor.

That flies under my personal level of comfort if I’m running a branded media account. Then again, they all have different standards, you know, like Julia Roberts in Pretty Woman – who would do everything but kiss on the mouth.

However … then it got Richard-Gere-just-called-you-a-whore ugly.

Immediately, instead of promising to dig more or work to validate the claim, the account then turned the burden of proof on the public and chose to believe that because nobody would play their game and answer with hard evidence that their conspiracy wasn’t true, then it must be a real something.

(Never mind you spent most of the afternoon rolling around in an unnecessary wrestling match while the entire crypto world had its best day in months. Silly.)

Oy vey.

Look, account person, the public isn’t the media. It isn’t the public’s job to do your job. If you believe there is a question to be answered, a case to be solved, etc., it’s on you. Otherwise, you’re lazy and doing a disservice to your brand and the beat you cover. Or, you’re just gossip.

I don’t think that’s what you’re after, ICO Journal, so do better. Your shrinking audience deserves the best effort you can give.

As for the social media management side, everyone wants to be the master snark these days, don’t they? I hate to break it to you, but not everybody is Wendy’s Twitter. From what I’ve watched, you certainly aren’t, so maybe ease up on the snark since it seems like it might be your Mogwai. You just aren’t ready for the task of using snarky humor in your tweets.

Grow up. Learn some responsibility in your role as a crypto and blockchain info source. And, maybe, just maybe, we’ll see you and Gizmo all grown up in a sequel.

*****

Have a tip? 

Or, what topics would you like to read about as we all grow with Crypto and Blockchain? Shoot an email to kitchenski@gmail.com with “Blog idea” in your subject line, or find me on Twitter at twitter.com/curtiskitchen. And, FULL DISCLOSURE: I am a Tron (TRX) investor. I am not a financial advisor. This content should not be used as a base for or considered to be financial advice.

Hollywood eyeing Tron/BitTorrent?

“The old guard are following events, and watching carefully.”

A few weeks ago, the public general reaction to Justin Sun and Tron purchasing BitTorrent ranged on a scale from “BitTorrent is still a thing?” to “What’s a Tron?”

Within the blockchain and crypto communities, however, the move created one hell of a buzz.

In that excitement, Tron loyalists have begun digging into BitTorrent’s history. What they are finding are loads of examples of exactly why Justin Sun made it a priority to add not just any peer-sharing apparatus, but this one. 

Some of what was uncovered in recent days:

– Though it made news this past week by visiting with Sun, Twitter was on board with BitTorrent … all the way back in 2010.

– So was Facebook.

– At its core, BitTorrent’s Paygate service in 2014 was headed in the right direction for putting a lot of money back in the pockets of artists.

– And, an added bonus for you: Want to know why the Tron/BitTorrent match is absolutely perfect? Read this 2014 piece from the Harvard Business Review and keep Tron in your mind as you consider the article’s final paragraph.

Putting ALL of that aside, it’s no secret that Hollywood itself knows BitTorrent’s potential power. It also has been watching BitTorrent’s move. “The old guard are following events, and watching carefully,” a Hollywood production insider told me.

It all has brought legitimacy to Tron’s stated larger vision of decentralizing the Internet and putting creative control back fully in the hands of entertainment creators.*


*If you’re new to this concept, do you know Taylor Swift? She famously wrote an opinion piece for the Wall Street Journal in 2014 and in it said:

“It’s my opinion that music should not be free,
and my prediction is that individual artists and their labels
will someday decide what an album’s price point is.”

Swift was almost right, except, with Tron’s smart contracts abilities, an artist wouldn’t even need the label if they didn’t want to go down that road. Thinking of her words now and pairing her thoughts with today’s Tron option…

Taylor Swift, with her iconic stature, is the unlikely mass-appeal hero that Tron needs and should use to break through to the general public.


But, even still, there seemed to be a large amount of doubt circling Justin Sun’s project – reflected in Tron’s trading price, not to mention in the confidence of pump-addicted detractors willing to share their well-reasoned, logical thoughts via Twitter.

Their issue, of course, is that they don’t, won’t, or can’t see past Tron as anything more than a cryptocurrency. That’s a shame because they’re missing the point.

According to digital content producer Robert S. Seppälä, Tron’s nabbing of BitTorrent is the real deal-maker – far ahead of the Tron token that so many one-pump chumps are hoping to cash in on.

“I agree the ]TRON] currency is cool, but beyond the bean counting, I believe it’s the content and entertainment delivered in the future that will drive this new world of decentralization through Tron,” said Seppälä, who is producer, director, and writer for EverTell. “It’s exciting.”

From many accounts, he’s not alone in that thinking.

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Have a tip? 

Or, what topics would you like to read about as we all grow with Crypto and Blockchain? Shoot an email to kitchenski@gmail.com with “Blog idea” in your subject line, or find me on Twitter at twitter.com/curtiskitchen. And, FULL DISCLOSURE: I am a Tron (TRX) and Ripple (XRP) investor. I am not a financial advisor. This content should not be used as a base for or considered to be financial advice.

The Tron Virtual Machine is going to rock worlds – yours, mine, everybody’s

Sometimes, you have to let the reality of a dream settle in before you can appreciate it. Then again, being able to see that reality before anyone else is called vision, and there’s a reason why it is such a sought after talent.

Tron is fast becoming that reality for those who follow it — and many more who don’t. It’s what happens when you stop boring the public with barely recognizable terms like “mainnet”, “torrent”, and “blockchain” and instead start mixing in specific panty-droppers like “Twitter”, “Facebook”, “100 million or more users”, “music sharing”, “porn”, “biggest file sharer in the world”, “gaming”, and “Facebook”.

Hi, Tron…er…Shannon.

Yes, friends, those terms are major turn-ons, especially after they’ve all legitimately been linked to Tron in just the last few weeks. (Funny enough, BitTorrent has almost everything to do with that…which has a lot of folks beginning to understand one of the the reasons why BitTorrent was part of Justin Sun’s plan from the beginning.)

When that moment of puzzle-pieces-coming-together realization hits, I imagine it’s like that scene in American Pie when Shannon Elizabeth cozies up to Jason Biggs, who loses control immediately…twice.

Just to make the image clear (because it’s a good one):

Shannon = recent Tron news
Jason = Tron investor

But, this has happened before, hasn’t it?

  • Tron news surfaced late in 2017 about a possible connection to Alibaba, and the charts resembled a Bill Clinton impersonation of the Washington Monument.
  • Tron MainNet goes live, and folks felt like they were led on. (I’m not sure why…it’s like they mistook the vibrating bed turning on for the entire sexual experience.)
  • Ethereum “Independence Day” came and went, and instead of carnal investment bliss, many folks were bored or frustrated with sinking prices amid a prolonged token swap. (I’m still waiting, and it sucks. Thanks, Bittrex.)
  • Never mind that everyone’s current daddy, Bitcoin, keeps sticking its head in at inopportune times and thwarting Tron’s potential growth moments.

And it’s all led to Tron loyalists having to tell the rest of the world that it isn’t about the size of our .0337 coin, it’s the quality.

Hang in there, Tronics. Your Dirk Diggler “star” moment is approaching. As someone who loathes hearing and seeing such a thing from others, it is time to circle a date on the calendar.

July 30.

The Tron Virtual Machine will open for business, and there’s no reason to believe a hungry-eyed group of developers won’t flock to the Sun Bunny Ranch. The list of advantages is well-known by now (easy, cheap, high distribution potential, big partnerships, nice rewards, etc.), and the latest big piece of the machine will be available.

The rest has been extremely nice, but THAT news has me excited. Above a lot of other things, I think that’s when we all will get to see Tron fully come to life and start to grow.

And, if things go right, grow to something big enough to make even Ron Jeremy jealous.

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What topics would you like to read about as we all grow with Crypto and Blockchain? Shoot an email to kitchenski@gmail.com with “Blog idea” in your subject line, or find me on Twitter at twitter.com/curtiskitchen. And, FULL DISCLOSURE: I am a Tron (TRX) and Ripple (XRP) investor. I am not a financial advisor. This content should not be used as a base for or considered to be financial advice.

K-State basketball: Disgruntled fan’s pipe dream

This quote from Twitter, which came in a conversation thread regarding Bruce Weber, caught my eye on Monday because it is the quintessential disgruntled Kansas State Wildcats basketball fan’s coaching pipe dream in a nutshell.

“whoever we get, i want it to be someone who will stay forever & be successful, and fill up the octagon, make it a tough place to win.”

Undeterred by the latest examples of extreme rise-and-falls (Tom Crean) and loyal-until-tomorrows (Brad Underwood), and fueled by watching their former coach make another Sweet 16 (Frank Martin), the fans who want so badly for K-State to make a coaching move (as the poll following the Cincinnati loss suggests) are frothing even more today. They’re just sure they’re missing out on …

whoever we get.

And when that “whoever” shows up, it’ll be a “no more Bruceketball!” party and long honeymoon as the wins start to flow with Weber’s former players, which proves he wasn’t the guy to break through with this roster despite an upward trend. Or maybe the losses come instead, but that’s okay because the new staff obviously needs time to dismantle Weber’s obviously crappy work.

In either case, that guy will get all the time needed to “fix” things because those fans will have given their heart to him in hopes that their new rebound “whoever” …

“will stay forever and be successful …”

And that coach should be successful because those fans who were so steadfast in withholding their support from Bruce Weber will now flock to games – regardless of results (because that’s how this “not Bruce” thing will work, right?) …

and fill up the octagon, make it a tough place to win.”

Early on at least, this new “whoever” will need and deserve fans’ help in building a home court advantage that possibly leads to a few more key home wins – wins those same fans felt the last coach needed to get without their help because he should have to prove something to them first.

All of this totally seems fair, doesn’t it?

I guess you just hope “whoever” actually gets the kind of one-direction support needed to succeed – something that has embarrassingly been lacking for a couple of years now at KSU. It’s one thing to question, but to outright boycott a team that hasn’t really given reason to do so? That does nobody – players, coaches, administration, or even the fans themselves – any favors.

After Cincy loss, 30-year K-State season ticket holder is done

So, here we are … the end of the season.

We knew we’d get here eventually, even if it was a game or two longer than a solid minority of Kansas State fans wanted. And, the end came in the exact fashion they had been salivating over: overmatched and out-toughed by Cincinnati like a big brother holding his little bro’s head under his armpit for an NCAA-sized noogie.

Losing in the NCAA Tournament never leaves a good feeling – the finality of it all and other things – but this one is obviously different. In 99 of 100 other similar situations – 20 games for the first time in three years, first NCAA Tournament appearance for the first time in that same span, picked ninth in the Big 12 before finishing sixth, and returns its starting backcourt and a promising young big man next year (no, not Dean Wade – K-State radio color analyst Stan Weber said as much on Friday during a segment on Sports Radio 810 WHB in Kansas City when he said the other players basically decided to stop waiting on him to figure things out) – this season would be reason for at least cautious optimism going forward.

But those other 99 situations don’t have the inexplicable caveat that a sizable portion of a fan base has simply washed its hands of a coach and wants its administration to do the same. They’re tired of drinking 3.2% Weber beer and barely getting a winning buzz. They want to get winning hammered, even if they don’t know where to buy it.

Regardless, an increasing number of fans want to go shopping, including some who gave it a legitimate go and have legitimate power in their actions.

For example, a season ticket of 30+ consecutive years keenly watched the past year and decided after Friday’s conclusion that they are finished until a change is made. Here’s the note they sent me on Twitter:

“If they keep this man after that effort, I believe I may have to save what amounts to $1000, once I make the full donation, pay for the tickets and parking, the gas and eating out.

“Hard to end over 30 years of loyalty, but the way we play has no semblance of heart, or recruited and developed skill. That got Altman, Asbury and Wooldridge out of here by the 5-year mark. I would think it would do so for a 60-year-old man. It’s probably going to take him resigning, because I don’t think an athletic department in flux, without a permanent choice for AD in place, to would probably pull the trigger.

“Does your voice resonate enough to help us small donors have any say in this? I sure wish the large donors, who effect any of these decisions anyway, knew how a bunch of us little guys feel. If a change is made, I’m sending my dollars right back in. No change, no reaching of 32 years on the streak!!”

It doesn’t sound like this fan is alone in thinking this way.

I don’t know if I have a voice that reaches the decision makers at K-State, and I don’t agree with how things have played out, but here’s hoping those KSU decision-making folks understand exactly how deep-rooted, and growing, their issue is.

More than a few K-State fans want their team to lose

A couple of recent polls illustrate a fan base nearly split between wanting its team to win in the postseason and wanting a new coach.

The “Bruce Weber sucks no matter what he does” narrative has been a thing in and around Kansas State for some time; all the way back to the coach’s very first day for some Wildcats basketball fans. 

How large that thing actually is has been unmeasured to this point, with the popular thought being that most of the rage boiled down to a vicious but vocal minority.

K-State’s best season since 2013-14 – at least 20 wins, a sixth-place finish in the Big 12 after getting picked ninth, and a return to the NCAA postseason (technically, considering it’s the “Last 4 In”) would seem to be the perfect time to prove that assertion. After all, the program seemed to show a trend upward the past three years, if only a very slight one, moving from 15 to 17 to at least 20 wins.

But hey, progress is progress … until it isn’t, apparently, as a couple of recent Twitter polls showed a pretty serious split among fans when asked to choose between their team winning and getting a new coach.

The first poll was conducted right after K-State knocked Baylor out of the Big 12 Tournament.

Interesting, right? I mean, four out of 10 K-State fans* are still hoping their coach gets canned after a big win that was needed in order to break a postseason drought.

*This statement, and this entire post, makes the assumption that it was K-State fans who voted in the polls. Is it 100-percent guaranteed that every vote had purple in its veins? No. Is it a pretty safe bet that nearly all of those votes were K-State fans? I feel pretty confident in saying yes, mostly because nobody outside of this fanbase cares enough about KSU’s troubles to try and sway a vote like this one.

Still the bigger shocker came via the second poll conducted Sunday afternoon, right after K-State’s name was called to participate in the NCAA Tournament play-in game against Wake Forest.

Just 60 percent of 463 votes said they were happy K-State made the postseason. That left 40 percent saying they either weren’t happy or were conflicted.

That’s no small minority. And, it doesn’t really matter how things got to this point, even if it’s sometimes illogical or unfair.* That nearly half of a fan base can’t or won’t put positive results ahead of wishing for a new head coach demands legitimate attention.

*Personally, I’ve found many of the arguments against Weber to be vague and dishonest — “He’s one of the worst coaches in the league” or “This team keeps getting worse under Weber.” This all despite results showing that Weber has either had success in the past or held his own. Take this year, for example, when he beats every other Big 12 coach outside of Bill Self and Steve Prohm with a team picked to finish ninth. He isn’t the best coach in the league, but he certainly appears to be on par with most of the other ones.

Twitter conversation the past few days also has asked whether Bruce Weber might be the beneficiary of a fluid athletic director situation. In short, one would have to believe so, right? A school president wouldn’t put a coaching hire on the shoulders of an interim director, or shouldn’t. Or, if that does happen, one would believe the interim tag would be lifted soon after.

That timeline bears watching, and in the mean time, it gives Weber, whose current contract runs through the 2018-19 season, enough time to go win a couple of games in the next week and complicate things even more.